Nick Kypreos

Sportsnet Broadcaster, Former NHLer

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Nick Kypreos is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey left-winger. He played eight seasons in the National Hockey League for the Hartford Whalers, Washington Capitals, New York Rangers, and Toronto Maple Leafs. He is currently a hockey analyst on the Rogers Sportsnet cable television network in Canada.

Though a very effective goal scorer in junior with the North Bay Centennials of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), Kypreos immediately became known as an enforcer at the NHL level, a role he maintained throughout his pro career. He was never drafted by an NHL team, but was signed as a free agent by the Philadelphia Flyers on the eve of his second junior season. However, his NHL career began with the Washington Capitals.

In 1994, Kypreos was a member of the Stanley Cup champion New York Rangers. He made his final NHL stop with his hometown Toronto Maple Leafs. As a Leaf, his career ended as the result of a concussion sustained in a fight in a pre-season game in September, 1997. After the injury, Kypreos suffered post-concussion syndrome and was forced to retire.

Since retiring as a player, Kypreos has gone on to greater fame as a hockey analyst for the Rogers Sportsnet cable television network in Canada. He also co-hosts Hockey Central at Noon on The Fan 590 in Toronto and simulcast on Sportsnet.

Kypreos has also appeared on Sportsnet's main rival, TSN, for some extra analysis work, notably when Hockey Canada announced the Canadian national team for the 2010 Winter Olympics.

Kypreos is a passionate speaker. A teammate once mentioned that he could "talk a pit bull off a meat wagon."

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Olympics

 

Hockey

 

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Tweets by Nick Kypreos

3 days ago
Surprising no negotiations on a new contract ever took place between Barry Trotz and Caps since theIr championship. Trotz had a clause to extend his old deal by 2 years with a minimal bump if he won the Stanley Cup. He declined, choosing to exercise a resignation clause instead.